Paint the town red… green, blue & yellow

Stretching from the city centre to the suburbs Perth is changing. Buildings and laneways are becoming urban tapestries of colour with street art revitalising our public spaces. What were once blank walls are now transforming into living landscapes bringing colour and personality to the streets.

On the side of Rifos in Maylands, painted by Samuel Kim

On the side of Rifos in Maylands, painted by Samuel Kim

On the side of Gemma's Health & Beauty Spa. Artist Daek Williams

On the side of Gemma’s Health & Beauty Spa. Artist Daek Williams

Art by Shime in Maylands

Art by Shime in Maylands

Although there is an abundance of street art in the city, it is now more and more apparent in suburban life.

Jumping the Shark painted by Fieldey on the side of the Good Store in Vic Park

Jumping the Shark painted by Fieldey on the side of the Good Store in Vic Park

Painted on the side of Saigon Corner in Victoria Park by Graffiti Galaxi

Painted on the side of Saigon Corner in Victoria Park by Graffiti Galaxi

At the rear of the Good Store Vic Park you can see James Giddy's colourful elephants

At the rear of the Good Store Vic Park you can see James Giddy’s colourful elephants

Igniting the walls with bold geometric masterpieces and contemporary characters, local and international artists are revitalising otherwise blank and boring areas.

Painted by Fieldey on the side of Brando's Pizza in Vic Park

Painted by Fieldey on the side of Brando’s Pizza in Vic Park

Painted on Standby Cafe in Mt Lawley by Daek Williams

Painted on Standby Cafe in Mt Lawley by Daek Williams

Colourful cow on the side of Sugar & Spice Inglewood. Artist Anya Brock

Colourful cow on the side of Sugar & Spice Inglewood. Artist Anya Brock

The bursts of colour on our walls could easily have you thinking these photos are from the hip and trendy Melbourne instead of Perth. But move over Hosier Lane, Perth’s suburb of Maylands is ranked as one of the three coolest suburbs in Australia, thanks to its gritty and artisanal edge.

Painted on the side of the Bassendean Oriental Restaurant by Melski

Painted on the side of the Bassendean Oriental Restaurant by Melski

Artwork on Mondo Butchers in Inglewood recognising the Beaufort St trams from 1899-1958. Artist Melski

Artwork on Mondo Butchers in Inglewood recognising the Beaufort St trams from 1899-1958. Artist Melski

Striking musical mural in Mt Lawley by PablitoSomething

Striking musical mural in Mt Lawley by PablitoSomething, can you recognize the musicians?

Painted on the side of Henry on Eighth in Maylands by Jodee Knowles

Painted on the side of Henry on Eighth in Maylands by Jodee Knowles

But just as art speaks in different ways it is not an everlasting story. What is here today, may be painted over, defaced or the building demolished tomorrow. Maybe knowing that it may not be here forever is what makes us appreciate street art more. Late last year paintball bandits hit the same cool suburb of Maylands hitting many of the stunning murals. However luckily photography captures these images forever.

Lady Poise painted this sassy lady on the side of the Bottle-O in Vic Park

Lady Poise painted this sassy lady on the side of the Bottle-O in Vic Park AKA Posier Lane

Holly Rayes cafe in Bassendean. Artist Anya Brock

Holly Rayes cafe in Bassendean. Artist Anya Brock

Colourful zebras painted by Anya Brock on the side of Ootong & Lincoln cafe Fremantle

Colourful zebras painted by Anya Brock on the side of Ootong & Lincoln cafe Fremantle

Street art is fun and vibrant as artists are being commissioned to brighten and rejuvenate otherwise lifeless walls. Artists are using walls of buildings and houses as canvases speaking directly to their audience.

Painted by Melski behind Fresh Provisions in Mt Lawley

Painted by Melski behind Fresh Provisions in Mt Lawley

On the side of a house in Fremantle by Lady Bananas, Lady Poise and Tomahawk

On the side of a house in Fremantle by Lady Bananas, Lady Poise and Tomahawk

There is something about illicit public artworks that is gaining genuine appreciation and acceptance and for as long as there are open spaces and a means for this creative expression I am sure it will be bombing our walls.

Be the change that you want to see in the world on a Victoria Park home by Konfucius Art By Destroy and Idol Motions

Be the change that you want to see in the world on a Victoria Park home by Konfucius Art By Destroy and Idol Motions

Street art was once an underground movement and today is an accepted form where boring gritty laneways morph into colourful murals.  

 

Birds under bridge in Claremont by Anya Brock

Birds under bridge in Claremont by Anya Brock

Birds under bridge in Claremont by Anya Brock

Birds under bridge in Claremont by Anya Brock

Birds under bridge in Claremont by Anya Brock

Birds under bridge in Claremont by Anya Brock

Birds under bridge in Claremont by Anya Brock

Birds under bridge in Claremont by Anya Brock

Street art creates a cultural tourism allowing visitors to come to an area to experience and enjoy the artwork. Unlike a gallery, people can return to the area increasing the economics by spending time and money in the many restaurants and cafes that commission local artists to create inspiring pieces.

This amazing piece by Fieldey was defaced by paintball bandits

This amazing piece by Fieldey was defaced by paintball bandits

Posier Lane in Victoria Park, artist unknown

Posier Lane in Victoria Park, artist unknown

Can be seen in the laneway of Hubert St Vic Park. Painted by Lynk Woolnough

Can be seen in the laneway of Hubert St Vic Park. Painted by Lynk Woolnough

Have you visited a cafe with some interesting street art? Do you know other suburbs like Maylands that have lots of buildings rejuvenated with murals?

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Perth's suburbs are changing. Buildings and laneways are becoming urban tapestries of colour with street art revitalising our public spaces into living landscapes bringing colour and personality to the streets.

The death of street art in Perth

It is clear to see street art is flourishing in Perth with new and exciting works continuously popping up. But sadly last weekend we noticed one of the most incredible murals we’d seen in Perth has been demolished, all in the name of progress.

This massive mural, which was free to see in the open air carpark in Murray Street, Perth is now an unforgettable memory.

What was once plain and uninspiring brick walls was transformed into a vibrant, lively picture mural. True to the context of street art where nothing is permanent, this captivating mural had been an integral part of Perth’s artistic culture, thanks to FORM since 2014.

Our urban landscape has been enriched with a push from City of Perth to create a cultural infrastructure in open spaces. Utilising the streets as open air exhibition space it is clear to see that the artists’ talents were appreciated by both local viewers and tourists.

The mural was a collaboration painted by 3 artists, Gaia from USA, Beastman from Sydney and Vans the Omega from Adelaide.

The design flows along the wall at the roadside with Gaia’s black and white mural called Dementia. The mural begins with a collage of moments from planning and development of the CBD. It includes Perth businessman Alan Bond and shows Perth buildings including Government House, His Majesty’s Theatre and the State Theatre. It also features Gordon Stephenson, who made a profound contribution to the planning and development of the city of Perth.

The wall then picks ups some colour graduating into a depiction of wetlands from a collage of moments from the city of early modern planning to skyscraper development in the CBD.

As the wall continues it is then transformed with bright, multicolour swirls and a kaleidoscopic bubblegum euphoria of geometric and prismatic colour.

The mural is finished with a 60’s inspired abstract, mannequin like face.

Street art is seen as transient phenomena, repurposing bland walls into momentary grandeur. It is nice to see some of the bland and unattractive walls uplifted as the artists leave their mark. And even if it is only temporary, street art is definitely flourishing in Perth. 

Do you agree while it’s a shame this vibrant mural was demolished with the wall, it was worth transforming an otherwise boring carpark for 3 years? What do you think about our street art in Perth? 

What are you waiting for?  Share this post or leave a comment below. If you like this post and want to read more like this why not subscribe to our Newsletter? We won’t spam you or share your personal details. If you’re not doing so already, please follow us on FacebookTwitter and Instagram or click the StumbleUponFlipboard or other social media buttons below to share this post with others who might enjoy reading it. If you want to come back to this post again, pin the photo using the red Pinterest button below. 

Haunted places in Perth and Western Australia

Recently I was asked to join other travel bloggers writing about haunted places for a collaboration about Spooky Places from around the World to visit for Halloween and it was quite interesting to see all the creepy places people wrote about. We wrote about Taman Festival in Bali, a deserted theme park, a place where the locals say has been taken over by evil spirits.

Taman Festival, Sanur

This got us thinking about some haunted places closer to home and began searching for haunted places around Perth. I quickly learnt that Western Australia has its fair share of ghost stories and places said to be haunted. Claims of haunted places like hotels, hospitals, prisons and houses are common.

Tunnel under the Roundhouse

Whilst many ghost stories are folklore, urban myth or even a hoax, there are many who will vouch for the supernatural events. Whether it be people claiming to have been tapped on the shoulder, overcome by cold sensations, or other circumstances, I dare you to visit some of these places for Halloween.

I double dare you to visit a place that is known as one of the most haunted places in the Southern Hemisphere. Now you’d expect this place to be a creepy looking old building, not a beautiful old gothic styled building with tall gable finials on the front facade.  Before this 150 year old building became a bustling hub and Fremantle’s home of live music and weekend festivals, it was a local insane asylum. The Fremantle Lunatic Asylum, built using convict labour in 1861 was later known as the Asylum for the Criminally Insane. Fremantle Arts Centre by day looks quite grand and inviting, but by night the halls and rooms of the centre are said to have a creepier feel. A ghost is said to be a soul in torment and it’s claimed taunting voices can be heard along with all the spooky hallmarks of a haunted house. These include cold spots, voices, banging noises, ghostly touches, moving objects, sounds of footsteps and generally strange feelings. Unfortunately back in the day society had little general compassion for mental health and cruelty at the hands of the asylum’s authorities was quite common. The haunted spirits are believed to be past occupants of the asylum.

Fremantle Lunatic Asylum

History has shown that three sisters, daughters of a prominent community figure, died in the asylum. One of them had mental health issues and all three were exploited sexually. Another of the spirits is said to that of a little girl who was locked in one of the cells in the building and terrified would constantly bang on the door pleading to be let out. People today have heard a child calling and every window in the building vibrate violently as doors start opening and closing by themselves.

Another is said to be a ghost of an elderly woman, known as the lady in black, who is seen wandering in the corridors. Redheads beware. It is said she was originally a patient committed by her husband after her mental condition worsened by grief when her red-headed daughter was taken away from her. She ended her life by jumping out of the window on the first floor and today it is alleged the woman still searches for her daughter. In the room where the woman jumped to her death, a child’s voice has been heard singing. Now when red-headed people visit the arts centre, many have had a feeling their hair is being pulled as if the lady in black is continuing her search for her daughter.

Fremantle Arts Centre

Many of the stories today have resulted from the ghost tours that use to be run at the Art Centre. One was about hearing the awful crying of a lady. Quiet and terrified the group continued downstairs and a lady at the back of the group, still at the top of the stairs felt a gentle hand on her shoulder and suddenly a second set of hands on her back gave her an almighty push. Was this the hands of a nasty nurse who use to do this type of thing to those poor souls who were patients many years ago?

Some people claim to see faces at the windows, but those windows are covered on the inside.

Fremantle Arts Centre

Many had mentioned a strong smell of burning, like the overpowering, unpleasant smell of burning flesh and are surprised to learn that at the turn of the century they administered electric shock treatments to patients at the asylum. 

What was once a lunatic asylum, full of suffering, sadness and murders is today the Fremantle Arts Centre. The iconic heritage building was originally the first purpose built lunatic asylum in WA and has since been a Women’s home, Naval base in WW1 and WW2 and a Technical College before opening in 1972 as The Fremantle Arts Centre. The centre today runs culturally rich programs of art courses, exhibitions and outdoor music concerts in the shady, grassed courtyard. A unique range of WA-made wares are available at the giftshop, Found and enjoy a coffee or snack from Canvas Café.

Freamtnle Arts Centre

The dark and haunted past and strange phenomena will perhaps send a chill up your spine and give you shivers this halloween… if you dare to visit.

Fremantle Gaol

The Old Fremantle Prison was home to many disgruntled prisoners, many of whom faced the gallows. Fremantle Prison is the largest prison built by convicts in Australia. Built in 1850’s and used as a maximum security gaol until 1991 it is a striking landmark and physical reminder of the incarcerations that occurred over 136 years. A monument to the uncomfortably recent punishment, the foreboding 5 metre high walls surrounds the solitary cells and gallows. Today visitors can step inside and hear stories of loneliness, pain and suffering. The prison was a place where the guilty were punished by hangings and floggings a place where convicts escaped, where innocent people were unjustly imprisoned and where executions have gone wrong.

Fremantle Prison

There are ghost stories of the Aboriginals of the area before the prison was built and inmates that were executed and prisoners who were classed as insane. When convict transportation began in 1850 the number of people with mental illness in the colony increased and Western Australia’s first mentally ill patients were cared for in the Round House until the asylum was built. Some of the first convicts to arrive in the country were the most notorious and violent and the Old Fremantle Prison and structures including the Roundhouse were used as holding pens.

Inside Fremantle Prison

For 150 years Fremantle Prison was a place of torture, incarceration, unhappiness and finally hanging, it’s no wonder it’s a place of talk about ghosts and unhappy souls. There is talk of the timely appearance of owls on the anniversaries of several hangings along with beams of light, peculiar smells, flying objects and other strange occurrences. The tunnels underneath the gaol are where a lot of the stories come from. If you descend 20 metres beneath the prison there is a one kilometre labyrinth of tunnels to be explored by boat. Tours highlight prison life with talk laced with prison humour about daring escapes and of the colourful characters as well as the darker side of the prison’s history.

Stories are told of a 15 year old boy who in 1844 was publicly hanged in front of the Round house. This was prior to the presence of an execution chamber making him the first European to be legally executed.  They tell stories about the gallows, built in 1888, was the colony and then state’s only legal place of execution. And stories of Eric Edgar Cooke, the last tried and convicted murderer hanged at Fremantle Prison in 1964. Cooke was a serial killer who despite the reign of terror in the suburbs was the last man in Western Australia to face capital punishment. It took until 1984 to finally be officially abolished by State Parliament. These are just some of the stories echoed with these prison walls.

Fremantle Round House

The Fremantle Round House was the site of the state’s first legal execution and the oldest public building in Western Australia. Opened in January 1831, it was purpose built to hold persons convicted of crimes and used until 1886. One of the youngest inmates was a 15 year old who is said today to be the cause of things people hear go bump in the night. He was sentenced to death, for murder, despite pleading his innocence and hung at the front of the Round House. Being a lightweight, chains were tied to his legs to give him enough weight so his neck would break. After his death he was taken down and buried in a hole in the sandhills and the site was unmarked. It was later found that the person he was accused of murdering was in fact murdered by their own mother, a result of severe post natal depression.

Fremantle Round House

Image by ~ OnThreeLegs   

Moving to another port city, Old Gaol, Albany is said to be home to a few ghosts too. Not as many details are known of the souls who torment the old goal but locals have talked about hearing the clanking of chains and whistling throughout the restored cell block. Restless spirits have been rumoured to roam for many years and tales of sounds from the women’s cells of a baby crying have been told over the years. It is said to be a young woman who died during childbirth. Other than the baby, there is a few other ghosts that are rumoured to haunt the Albany gaol. In the women’s section is Emily and haunting the black hole is Joseph. It is even said a ghostly dog haunts the building.  A night tour of the Old Albany Gaol is a spine tingling way to experience some of Albany’s history.

Albany Gaol

Many ghost stories evolve from lost love in some way and is basis of the story of Catherine’s ghost. Catherine died of a broken heart after a long search for her missing husband, Cathal. He was convicted to a 10 year sentence and unable to write, couldn’t get word back to Catherine of his whereabouts. After a long search she eventually tracked him down in Albany and made the journery to there and finally was set to meet him. Cathal had arranged to catch a boat to meet her and as soon as he caught sight of her in Oyster Harbour stood from his small boat to wave to her. He overbalanced and fell into the water and drowned. Catherine is said to haunt the harbour after dying of a broken heart.

Albany Gaol

The stories of ghosts would not be complete without a creepy tale of a headless horseman and this one is quite close to where we have lived. A headless horseman in Kenwick? Kenwick Pioneer Cemetery is a reminder of the struggles and achievements undertaken by the pioneers of the district. For a chance to spot him, a man riding a horse and holding his own head is said to appear around midnight on the flyover on the rail line to Armadale, directly behind the old Kenwick cemetery. It is said the man is an English soldier who died long ago when England first colonised Australia. This one is pretty scary, right? Or is this just a spooky story to scare kids away from the cemetery at night?

Kenwick Pioneer Cemetery

Kalamunda Hotel is rumoured to be haunted by a female ghost on the second floor. A young lady who was seduced and became pregnant was too ashamed to face the world, so killed herself in room 24 by jumping from the balcony to her death. Chills, glowing lights and strange noises and sightings of the ghost of a blonde woman keep guests from staying too long in that room. A second ghost, this time male are the source of local folklore. Built in 1902, the hotel was, and is still used as, a bar, restaurant and bottle shop. Paddy Connolly, the original owner in his paranoia, erected barbed wire on the underside of the roof to prevent would be thieves from breaking in and it is said, would lock himself into his own roof space. Paddy is the male ghost seen who likes to hang about in the shadows. Paddy, it is said, apparently got a teenage girl pregnant and also ended his life by jumping from the balcony. The young girl who wanders around the hotel holding with a life-sized rag doll which scares the hill folk in the area. Other ghosts reported are an angry 60 year old man with a handle bar moustache and a beautiful woman in a Victorian dress. Whether or not you believe in ghosts, would you visit one of these haunted places for Halloween? So do you believe? I dare you to visit Kalamunda Hotel for Halloween.

Kalamunda Hotel

So there you have it, these places are some of Perth’s and Western Australia’s most haunted landmarks. But I’m sure there are many more. Whether you believe in ghosts or not, there are plenty of ghost stories about. And if you don’t believe in ghosts, you just might be at least a little curious now. If reading this has made your spine tingle you may want to research more. Leave me a comment.

Scardy cats, are you shaking much or got goose bumps reading this? Do you believe? Would you visit some of these places for Halloween?

What are you waiting for?  Share this post or leave a comment below. If you like this post and want to read more like this why not subscribe to our Newsletter? We won’t spam you or share your personal details. If you’re not doing so already, please follow us on FacebookTwitter and Instagram or click the StumbleUponFlipboard or other social media buttons below to share this post with others who might enjoy reading it.

Fun facts about Perth and Western Australia

Perth is a very unique city and with changes to the International flight routes allowing direct flights between Perth and London, more people than ever before will be able to experience just what it is that makes my home city so unique. Despite our dullsville tag, Perth is a vibrant city with picture perfect beaches. And beyond Perth, Western Australia has some amazing sights to see.

It is true, Western Australia’s capital, Perth is one of the most isolated city in the world, with the closest Australian city 2,200kms away. We are in fact closer to Singapore than we are to our own capital, Canberra. Western Australia is the world’s second largest state, the largest being in Russia and if we were a country, we’d be the 10th largest in the world. Did you know in 1933 we had a secession referendum to become a separate country and the proposal won? We have a Mediterranean climate with summer temperatures often exceeding 40°C (104°F) and in the summer months the Fremantle Doctor, a cooling sea breeze blows from 12pm to 3pm, brings a welcome relief. Perth is the third windiest city in the world making sailing and kite surfing extremely popular.

In 2016 Perth was ranked the 7th most liveable city in the world and was awarded a top 10 placing in the hottest destinations for travellers to visit in Australia. We are the 4th best city in the world for street art and with a minumum of 8 hours sunshine a day, we enjoy more sunshine than any other city in Australia.  And there is nothing prettier than watching the sun set in the west. Except maybe strolling through a quirky 16th century Tudor style arcade with an open roof to take in the vivid blue sky Perth is famous for.

Perth’s very own King’s Park is the largest city park in the world. Yes, at 400ha (988 acres) it is larger than Central Park in New York.  Here you can wander and take in spectacular views of the Swan River, overlooking Elizabeth Quay, the city skyline and Darling Ranges. There are bush trails, manicured gardens and Australia’s largest display of wildflowers throughout the Botanic Gardens.

Western Australians are known as Sandgropers and along with our unique name, our state has some pretty unique places too. Perth has its fare share of ghost stories and haunted places and renowned to have one of the best displays of tulips in a spectacular botanic garden referred to as Heaven in the hills

New Norcia, 132km north of Perth near the banks of the Moore River is Australia’s only monastic town. The monastery, home to the Benedictine monks is one of the 27 heritage listed buildings and every church, school and lunch bar in the small town surrounded by bushland is owned by monks. The New Norcia Hotel, built in 1927 nestled by gum trees is a comfortable, country pub to stay in.

The Pinnacles is two hours north of Perth in the Nambung National Park. There you will see the ancient desert sculptures, where the desert landscape is transformed with yellow limestone formations up to 5 metres tall rising out of the sand dunes.

Nature’s Window, in Kalbarri National Park is a wind eroded opening in the layered sandstone, creating a picture frame. The natural rock arch frames the Murchison river perfectly and is one of WA’s most iconic natural attractions.

852km’s north of Perth is Mount Augustus, the largest rock in the world. 8km’s long and 3km’s wide covering an area of 4,795 hectares the most spectacular solitary peak rises above a stoney, red sandplain of arid scrubland. The granite formation is visible from the air for more than 160 kms and is estimated to be 1,750 million years old.

Another old formation is Wave Rock, a four hour drive east from Perth, a natural rock formation shaped like an ocean wave about to break. The wave is 14 metres high and 110 metres long and is near the small town of Hyden. The grey and red  granite rock formation is 27 million years old.

Further up the coast, 1,200kms north of Perth, a 14 hour drive away rests Ningaloo Reef, near Exmouth. A World Heritage listed reef and home to the world’s largest fish, the 13 metre whale shark. The 300km coral reef is also the closest barrier reef to a land mass in the world with 500 species of fish and 300 varieties of coral.

In the opposite direction, 4.5 hours south of Perth is Dog Rock in Albany, a well known attraction in the Great Southern region of Western Australia. Situated on Middleton Road in 1921 the council were going to blow the large, natural granite rock up. It now sits with the road marked around the rock with a painted dog collar.

Also down south is Albany’s The Natural Bridge is a reminder of the surging power of ocean. Created by the continual wear and tear on the granite formation, the ocean’s constant crashing onto the granite cliffside resembles a giant rock bridge.

Western Australia has its fair share of natural resources and a booming mining industry. Located in the remote Kimberley region is Argyle Diamond Mine, the largest diamond producer in the world (by volume) and the only known significant source of pink and red diamonds.

The Kimberley coast is also home to Australia’s largest producer of pearls.

Two of the world’s largest producers of gold are located in Western Australia. The largest open cut mine until 2016 is the Super Pit at Kalgoorlie gold mine. The oblong pit is 3.5km long and 1.5km wide but a massive 570 metres deep making it visible from space.

Only 120km’s away from Perth is Boddington Gold Mine. With the first gold poured in 2009 it is now the country’s largest gold mine. Perth also has Australia’s oldest operating and official gold bullion mint which is owned by the State Government and been in operation since 1899. No wonder Perth is home to the highest per capita of self made millionaires.

Relax and watch the sun set across the famous waters of Cottesloe Beach or perhaps take a ferry across to Rottnest Island and meet Western Australia’s unique Quokkas. Despite being only 19km’s away from the mainland, these little marsupials are only found in Rottnest. We were so surprised in Heidelberg, Germany to see a sign outside a travel agent advertising our very own Quokkas.

There is so much to do on the amazing West Coast, in the beachside towns or the city centre. Snorkel coral reefs, dive shipwrecks, explore history sail on Perth’s beautiful river or learn to sail a yacht on the picturesque Matilda Bay. Perth is a city that loves the water, I mean why wouldn’t we, with 19 stunning beaches from Fremantle to Trigg we are certainly spoilt for choice to pitch our umbrella.

We have 12,500km’s beautiful, pristine coastline along the state. Its true, you just have to google Lucky Bay near Esperance, Billy Goat Bay or Dynamite Bay near Greenhead or Turquoise Bay near Exmouth  to see some of our whitest beaches with the most stunning bays with sparking clear blue waters. And one of our beaches at Geographe Bay in Busselton has the longest wooden jetty in the southern hemisphere. It is 1.8km’s long and was built in 1853 . For those who can’t make the 3.6km round trip out on the jetty there is a little red train that can take you on the 45 minute trip.

Perth is often labelled boring, expensive and stereotyped as having kangaroos hopping down the main street. And whilst our public transport can’t rival that of Europe it surely dispels the boring label.

As for expensive, there are 48 other cities that are ahead of us in the worldwide cost of living report for 2017. We can’t dispute we are isolated but not everywhere we travel to is far away and expensive to get to. In Perth we can get a return plane ticket to Bali for $130 on sale and can be there in less than 4hrs. That’s affordable and accessible in my books. But one thing I can’t dispel is the rumour about the kangaroos. They can be found in our main street in the city and also a few streets from my suburban home.

There is something about Perth that is magical, after all, we have not one, but two unicorns looking over us. 

Perth, Western Australia

 

Have you been to Perth or Western Australia? What do you think you’d enjoy here?

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Perth’s streets of colour

One of our favourite things about visiting new places is checking out the street art. Here in Australia it is Melbourne that holds the crown for street art. But luckily for those, who like us, live in the most isolated city in the world, we don’t have to travel to see good street art. 

Painted by Daek William, carpark between Roe Street and James Street, Northbridge

Painted by Kyle Hughes-Odgers , carpark between Roe & James Streets, Northbridge

Border Crossing by Audrey Fernandes-Satar, Wilson carpark Roe Street, Northbridge

Perth is now ranked #4 in the world for street art, behind Lisbon, New York and Melbourne. On the other side of the railway line is Northbridge, a really cool location. The area is a mecca for street art and has a buzz and vibe bought to life through some remarkable artists.

Painted by Curiot in Nicks Lane, Northbridge

Sugar Glider painted by Amok Island, Nicks Lane, Northbridge

Neon Artwork by Straker at the Roe Street entrance to Nick’s Lane

On the rear of Paramount Nightclub, painted by Anya Brock

We often spend our weekends wandering the city streets and lanes to find some amazing street art.

Pretty Patterns painted by Clare McFarlane & Paul Caporn, Prince Lane, Perth

Painted by Beastman & Vans the Omega, carpark in Murray Street, Perth

Update: Sadly the above wall has been removed 

Snake, painted by ROA, seen from Murray Street carpark

Huge mural painted by Phlegm

Dementia painted by Gaia, Murray Street carpark, Perth

Update: This above wall has now been removed

It is really exciting to turn a corner and be confronted by what was a blank, boring concrete wall, transformed into a massive piece of art. Most either have direct permission from council or are commissioned.

Painted by Tim Rollin in Murray Street carpark, Perth

Retro Space, painted by James Cooper and Martin E Wills, seen in carpark in Wolf Lane

Painted by Paul Deej Art and Humans of Perth, Wolf Lane carpark, Perth

Some very talented artists have chosen to use as a canvas the buildings in the city centre in Perth. Many an alleyway or car-park is the perfect backdrop for some of the finest street art the most remote city has to offer. 

On the wall of Secret Garden Cafe in Wolf Lane, Pained by Shrink

Squirrel in Wolf Lane, artist unknown

Mine Train Future, painted by Pixel Pancho in Wolf Lane, Perth.

Painted by Vans the Omega & Beastman at 140 Complex, Perth

Painted by Phibs Official-Graffiti/Fine Art/Street Art at The Coffee Club, 140 Complex, Perth

We found things from a huge snake, horses, cat, squirrel, even a sugar glider.

Painted by by Sioux Tempestt Artist, Grand Lane, Perth

Cabin Fever painted by Sheryo & The Yok, Bon March Arcade, Perth

The Conversation painted by Stormie Mills, Howard Lane, Perth

Night Forrest, Painted in Howard Lane by The Yok & Sheryo

Love it or loath it, you can’t deny it brightens up an otherwise dull and boring wall.

Painted by Alex Face at Long Chim Thai Restaurant, Perth

Totoro, by Idol Motions, Morris House, Pier Street, Perth

Painted by Idol Motions, Morris House, Pier Street, Perth

Painted by Shime at YHA Building, Wellington Street, Perth

Moving Landscapes painted by Eko Nugroho, Moore Street, Perth

Street art has now evolved into more than creative vandalism and is now a desirable art form breathing new life into forgotten spaces.

We have included a map of all the art that we showcase in this article with the hope it will encourage you to get out and explore our colourful city.

I hope you agree that street art is not an eyesore and can appreciate the difference between street art and graffiti. What do you think about our street art in Perth? Do you recognize any pieces from your favourite artist?

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